Trump Administration to use same army base to detain immigrant children that was used to house Japanese Americans during World War 2.

By |2019-06-14T04:37:51-08:00June 13th, 2019|Categories: News|Tags: , , , , , |3 Comments

Wait, really?

Courtesy of Time:

The Trump Administration has opted to use an Army base in Oklahoma to hold growing numbers of immigrant children in its custody after running out of room at government shelters.

Fort Sill, an 150-year-old installation once used as an internment camp for Japanese-Americans during World War II, has been selected to detain 1,400 children until they can be given to an adult relative, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

The agency said Fort Sill will be used “as a temporary emergency influx shelter” to help ease the burden on the government as it prepares to house a record number of minors even though it already operates about 168 facilities and programs in 23 states.

Health and Human Services said in a statement that it has taken about 40,900 children into custody through April 30. That’s a 57% increase from last year, which is a rate on-pace to surpass the record figures in 2016, when 59,171 minors were taken into custody. The agency had assessed two other military bases before selecting Fort Sill.

The children would be held inside facilities that are separate from the general on-base population. HHS personnel, not American troops, will oversee them.

So I assume we can drop the pretense and just openly say that we are holding immigrant children against their will in internment camps.

Right?

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This blog is dedicated to finding the truth, exposing the lies, and holding our politicians and leaders accountable when they fall far short of the promises that they have made to both my fellow Alaskans and the American people.

3 Comments

  1. anonymous June 13, 2019 at 10:23 am - Reply

    https://www.npr.org/2019/06/12/730258832/as-polar-ice-cap-recedes-the-u-s-navy-looks-north?utm_term=nprnews&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=npr&fbclid=IwAR1AKptef1TUE-UySDZ3Ikgvawu0wuTBfx-izN8uYVWK_TrPjfRsze1Rl-4

    Driving the push is that much of the commercial activity and development interest in the region is coming from nations that the Pentagon considers rivals, such as Russia and China.

    The Navy’s presence in Alaska has waxed and waned over the years. The state has abundant Army and Air Force assets, with the Coast Guard spread throughout. The Navy runs submarine exercises beneath the sea ice off Alaska’s northern coast.

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