Today is the day we remember “The Descent of Inanna.” Better known to Christians as “Easter.”

By |2019-04-20T14:58:11-08:00April 21st, 2019|Categories: News|Tags: , , , , |5 Comments

I know, I know, leave it to the Atheist to ruin another perfectly good Christian holiday by reminding us of its pagan roots. 

But hey, at least we learn something new, Right?

Courtesy of Ancient Origins:

According to some scholars, such as Dr. Tony Nugent, teacher of Theology and Religious Studies at Seattle University, and Presbyterian minister, the Easter story comes from the Sumerian legend of Damuzi (Tammuz) and his wife Inanna (Ishtar), an epic myth called “The Descent of Inanna” found inscribed on cuneiform clay tablets dating back to 2100 BC. When Tammuz dies, Ishtar is grief–stricken and follows him to the underworld. In the underworld, she enters through seven gates, and her worldly attire is removed. “Naked and bowed low” she is judged, killed, and then hung on display. In her absence, the earth loses its fertility, crops cease to grow and animals stop reproducing. Unless something is done, all life on earth will end.

After Inanna has been missing for three days her assistant goes to other gods for help. Finally one of them Enki, creates two creatures who carry the plant of life and water of life down to the Underworld, sprinkling them on Inanna and Damuzi, resurrecting them, and giving them the power to return to the earth as the light of the sun for six months. After the six months are up, Tammuz returns to the underworld of the dead, remaining there for another six months, and Ishtar pursues him, prompting the water god to rescue them both. Thus were the cycles of winter death and spring life.

Dr Nugent is quick to point out that drawing parallels between the story of Jesus and the epic of Inanna “doesn’t necessarily mean that there wasn’t a real person, Jesus, who was crucified, but rather that, if there was, the story about it is structured and embellished in accordance with a pattern that was very ancient and widespread.”

The Sumerian goddess Inanna is known outside of Mesopotamia by her Babylonian name, “Ishtar”. In ancient Canaan Ishtar is known as Astarte, and her counterparts in the Greek and Roman pantheons are known as Aphrodite and Venus. In the 4th Century, when Christians identified the exact site in Jerusalem where the empty tomb of Jesus had been located, they selected the spot where a temple of Aphrodite (Astarte/Ishtar/Inanna) stood. The temple was torn down and the So Church of the Holy Sepulchre was built, the holiest church in the Christian world.

Dr Nugent points out that the story of Inanna and Damuzi is just one of a number of accounts of dying and rising gods that represent the cycle of the seasons and the stars. For example, the resurrection of Egyptian Horus; the story of Mithras, who was worshipped at Springtime; and the tale of Dionysus, resurrected by his grandmother. Among these stories are prevailing themes of fertility, conception, renewal, descent into darkness, and the triumph of light over darkness or good over evil.

By the way, that is not the only possible origin of the Easter holiday, there is also this one:

A related perspective is that, rather than being a representation of the story of Ishtar, Easter was originally a celebration of Eostre, goddess of Spring, otherwise known as Ostara, Austra, and Eastre. One of the most revered aspects of Ostara for both ancient and modern observers is a spirit of renewal.

Celebrated at Spring Equinox on March 21, Ostara marks the day when light is equal to darkness, and will continue to grow. As the bringer of light after a long dark winter, the goddess was often depicted with the hare, an animal that represents the arrival of spring as well as the fertility of the season.

According to Jacob Grimm’s Deutsche Mythologie, the idea of resurrection was ingrained within the celebration of Ostara: “Ostara, Eástre seems therefore to have been the divinity of the radiant dawn, of upspringing light, a spectacle that brings joy and blessing, whose meaning could be easily adapted by the resurrection-day of the christian’s God.”

Most analyses of the origin of the word ‘Easter’ agree that it was named after Eostre, an ancient word meaning ‘spring’, though many European languages use one form or another of the Latin name for Easter, Pascha, which is derived from the Hebrew Pesach, meaning Passover.

My favorite thing about Christianity is how shamelessly derivative it is. 

Every single story in the new testament seems to have roots in already existing mythologies.

They just changed a couple of names and dates, and voila, you have an entirely “new” religion. 

Easter has never been a holiday that I care for much personally. 

Which might have been because my mother dressed us up like this.

Yeah, I’m the studly one on the left. 

And then of course later I was all nauseous from eating too much candy and hard boiled eggs. 

Anyhow, happy whatever you want to call it. 

About the Author:

This blog is dedicated to finding the truth, exposing the lies, and holding our politicians and leaders accountable when they fall far short of the promises that they have made to both my fellow Alaskans and the American people.

5 Comments

  1. AnonCO April 21, 2019 at 6:13 am

    Thanks, G – this was like being in my college “World Religions” class. Happy Easter, Passover, Sunday or whatever celebration you choose to observe.

  2. anon April 21, 2019 at 6:57 am

    Stairs for the first time in 300 years
    Visitors to Rome this Easter can have a once-in-a-lifetime experience: climbing the original stairs that Jesus is said to have walked on before his crucifixion.

    https://www.cnn.com/videos/style/2019/04/15/vatican-displays-holy-stairs-for-the-first-time-in-300-years.cnn

  3. JB$ April 21, 2019 at 8:00 am

    https://whyevolutionistrue.wordpress.com/2019/04/21/easter-special-nicholas-kristof-interviews-a-christian-who-doesnt-accept-the-tenets-of-christianity/?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=facebook

    KRISTOF Happy Easter, Reverend Jones! To start, do you think of Easter as a literal flesh-and-blood resurrection? I have problems with that.

    JONES When you look in the Gospels, the stories are all over the place. There’s no resurrection story in Mark, just an empty tomb. Those who claim to know whether or not it happened are kidding themselves. But that empty tomb symbolizes that the ultimate love in our lives cannot be crucified and killed.
    The God of Easter is vulnerable and is connected to the world in profound ways that don’t involve manipulating the world but constantly inviting us into love, justice, mercy. For me it’s impossible to tell the story of Easter without also telling the story of the cross. The crucifixion is a first-century lynching. It couldn’t be more pertinent to our world today.

  4. Anonymous April 21, 2019 at 8:22 am

    https://www.npr.org/2019/04/20/715470174/yellow-vest-protesters-fueled-by-anger-over-notre-dame-funds-march-in-paris?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=npr&utm_term=nprnews&utm_content=20190420&fbclid=IwAR3PL-TIVupcXBJTM-Did8PEitTKs037dLnq6H3ciI3cNiCpHDCOeGnKXBc

    FB>”To all who celebrate today, happy Easter from our family to yours! On this day of rebirth and renewal, let’s recommit to love and serve our brothers and sisters, especially those in need, in every way we can. Have a great day, everybody.”
    Barack Obama

  5. Nobody Important April 21, 2019 at 3:58 pm

    I knew Christians stole a lot of their holidays from pagan beliefs but I didn’t know all of those details. Nowadays Christians just steal from the taxpayers of this country, similarly to billionaires and many corporations. They really don’t give a flip about Jesus. Their true object of worship is the almighty dollar!

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