Courtesy of CNN:

Former President Barack Obama on Monday met with Swedish teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg as part of her visit to Washington, DC, to promote environmental issues.

“Just 16, @GretaThunberg is already one of our planet’s greatest advocates,” Obama tweeted after his meeting with Thunberg. “Recognizing that her generation will bear the brunt of climate change, she’s unafraid to push for real action.”

Thunberg established herself as a bona fide climate action figure after staging weekly sit-ins outside the Swedish Parliament, spawning a burgeoning movement of youth climate activists to hold their own protests in more than 100 cities worldwide.

She arrived in New York last month after sailing across the Atlantic to speak at the United Nations Climate Action Summit, which will take place on September 23. Thunberg traveled on a zero-emissions sailboat to reduce the environmental impact of her journey, according to a statement from her team.

My understanding is that Thunberg has no intention of meeting with Donald Tump, and seriously, why would she?

Thunberg also met with the Senate though that meeting was somewhat less amicable. 

Courtesy of The Guardian

At a meeting of the Senate climate crisis task force on Tuesday, lawmakers praised a group of young activists for their leadership, their gumption and their display of wisdom far beyond their years. They then asked the teens for advice on how Congress might combat one of the most urgent and politically contentious threats confronting world leaders: climate change.

Greta Thunberg, the 16-year-old Swedish activist who has galvanized young people across the world to strike for more action to combat the impact of global warming, politely reminded them that she was a student, not a scientist – or a senator.

“Please save your praise. We don’t want it,” she said. “Don’t invite us here to just tell us how inspiring we are without actually doing anything about it because it doesn’t lead to anything.

“If you want advice for what you should do, invite scientists, ask scientists for their expertise. We don’t want to be heard. We want the science to be heard.”

In remarks meant for Congress as a whole, she said: “I know you are trying but just not hard enough. Sorry.”

Clearly this sixteen-year-old does not pull any punches, and good for her for telling it like it is. 

This young lady is fighting for the future of our planet, we should all be fighting alongside her.